Countering Violent Extremism

Countering Violent Extremism Overview

Date: 
January 26, 2012

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Reports

Narrowing CVE Agenda Crucial in Counterterror Fight

Narrowing the countering violent extremism (CVE) agenda, investing in conflict prevention, respecting humanitarian law and limiting the use of force will all be crucial components of governments' work of fighting terrorism, according to a new report from the International Crisis Group, Exploiting Disorder: al-Qaeda and the Islamic State

The term “violent extremism” is often ill-defined and open to misuse. When it is identified as the main threat to stability, governments "risk downplaying other sources of fragility, delegitimising political grievances and stigmatising communities as potential extremists," the report states. Both governments and donors must think carefully what to label CVE, the report notes, adding, "Re-hatting as CVE activities to address 'root causes', particularly those related to states’ basic obligations to citizens – like education, employment or services to marginalised communities – may prove short-sighted." Preventing crises will be much more powerful in containing violent extremism than CVE, the report asserts. "Nudging leaders toward more inclusive and representative politics, addressing communities’ grievances and measured responses to terrorist attacks usually make sense." Read more

Narrowing the CVE Agenda Will be Crucial in Fight Against Terror

Date: 
March 16, 2016

Narrowing the countering violent extremism (CVE) agenda, investing in conflict prevention, respecting humanitarian law and limiting the use of force will all be crucial components of governments' work of fighting terrorism, according to a new report from the International Crisis Group, Exploiting Disorder: al-Qaeda and the Islamic State

The term “violent extremism” is often ill-defined and open to misuse. When it is identified as the main threat to stability, governments "risk downplaying other sources of fragility, delegitimising political grievances and stigmatising communities as potential extremists," the report states. Both governments and donors must think carefully what to label CVE, the report notes, adding, "Re-hatting as CVE activities to address 'root causes', particularly those related to states’ basic obligations to citizens – like education, employment or services to marginalised communities – may prove short-sighted." Preventing crises will be much more powerful in containing violent extremism than CVE, the report asserts. "Nudging leaders toward more inclusive and representative politics, addressing communities’ grievances and measured responses to terrorist attacks usually make sense." 

C&SN Joins More Than 50 Orgs in Raising Concerns About UN's Work on Preventing Violent Extremism

Date: 
February 8, 2016
Author: 

In a letter to the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, more than 50 organizations, including the Charity & Security Network, raise serious concerns about the UN's plans for preventing violent extremism (PVE), including a resolution and an upcoming panel on “human rights and preventing and countering violent extremism” at the 31st Session of the UN Human Rights Council. 

CSN Board Member Critiques UN's CVE Plan

In a new blog, Charity & Security Network advisory board member Naz Modirzadeh, founding director of the Harvard Law School Program on International Law and Armed Conflict, takes aim at UN Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon's new Plan of Action to Prevent Violent Extremism. In it, she identifies three "fatal flaws," including its failure to define "violent extremism," its lack of convincing evidence of the causes or "drivers" of violent extremism, and its prescription for a "host of programmatic, political, and institutional actions with significant implications."

Read the blog here.  

State Department Outlines CVE Strategy in New QDDR

Date: 
May 12, 2015

Countering violent extremism (CVE) plays a prominent role in the second Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review (QDDR), the State Department’s policy roadmap, released April 28 by Secretary of State John Kerry. While the CVE strategy, as outlined in the report, emphasizes the importance of a free and functioning civil society, it echoes the rhetoric from the February White House Summit on CVE and the September 2014 Presidential Memorandum, which focuses on restrictions imposed by foreign governments and does not address the global impact of U.S. restrictions on civil society. Desptie this, the QDDR presents yet another potential opening to create dialogue around this issue. Read more

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