Resources

115th Congress - Bill Tracking and Key Hearings

Date: 
May 11, 2017

Charity & Security Network is tracking the following bills during the 115th Congress:


Senate bills:

S. 68: Muslim Brotherhood Terrorist Designation Act of 2017
Introduced January 9

S 358: Stop Terrorist Operational Resouces and Money Act (STORM Act)
Introduced February 13
 

S 532: Stop Arming Terrorists Act (companion to HR 608) 
Introduced March 6
 

S 1158: Elie Wiesel Genocide and Atrocities Prevention Act
Introduced May 17
 

S 1241: Combatting Money Laundering, Terrorist Financing, and Counterfeiting Act of 2017
Introduced May 25
 

S 1343: A Bill to Amend the Internal Revenue Code Extend and Modify Certain Charitable Tax Provisions
Introduced June 13

 

House of Representatives bills:

HR 258: To Prohibit the Use of United States Government Funds to Provide Assistance to Al Qaeda, Jabhat Fateh al-Sham and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL)...
Introduced January 4
 

H.R. 377: Muslim Brotherhood Terrorist Designation Act of 2017 (companion to S. 68)
Introduced January 9
 

H.R. 608: Stop Arming Terrorists Act 
Introduced January 4
 

H.R. 1486: Securing American Non-Profit Organizations Against Terrorism Act of 2017
Introduced March 9
 

H.R. 1677 Caesar Syria Civilian Protection Act of 2017
Introduced March 22
Passed House of Representatives May 17
 

H.R. 2058: Charity Transparency Act of 2017
Introduced April 6
Talking points
 

HR 2622: Countering Terrorist Financing Act of 2017 
Introduced May 24

 

Key Congressional hearings:

Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission, Threats to Civil Society Around the World
March 21, 2017 

 

Studies/Reports Overview and Topic List

Date: 
August 24, 2015

The Charity and Security Network has created a number of abstracts of reports and studies relevant to our membership, with links to the original reports. Here you will find a list of these abstracts, organized by topic, including counterterrorism, financial access and remittances, humanitarian aid, material support and more.

You can also go directly to the most recent reports and studies

Analysis Overview and List of Topics

Date: 
May 13, 2013

The Charity & Security Network has prepared analysis on a number of topics relevant to our members, including Enabling Environment for Civil Society, Partner Vetting System, Material Support and Humanitarian Aid, as well as discussion of U.S. Departments of Treasury and State policies. Here you will find a list of topics and links. 

List of Experts

Date: 
June 2, 2012

The Charity and Security Network provides a list of experts with policy, legal and field experience on how national security laws impact nonprofits and the people they serve. To invite them for press interviews, conferences or other speaking events, please contact us

Civic Space Compromised in the Americas

Date: 
June 21, 2017

In many countries in the Americas, people's rights to organize, protest or speak out are severely compromised, according to a new report from the CIVICUS, Charity & Security Network, the Caribbean Policy Development Centre, the Latin American and Caribbean Network for Democracy (REDLAD), and the Rendir Cuentas initiative, Civic Space in the Americas

The report, which draws on research submitted to the CIVICUS Monitor, notes that civic space is seriously restricted in more than one-third of countries in the Americas. Obstacles to freedoms of expression, peaceful assembly and association include threats to personal safety, denial of the right to protest, and surveillance and censorship. Between June 2016 and May 2017, the most serious abuses and violations included disruptions of protests through excessive force, violence against journalists (including killings) and censorship of the media, detention and criminalization of activists, and the introduction of legislative restrictions on civic space freedoms (including 19 such bills in the U.S.). Indigenous peoples, Afro-descendants, women, LGBTI people, migrants and other minority groups were particularly affected. 

Rule Allows Charities Listed as Terrorist Supporters to Access, Pay Lawyers in Most Cases

Date: 
June 18, 2017
Author: 

When a nonprofit organization (NPO) is listed by the U.S. government as a supporter of terrorism its assets within U.S. jurisdiction are generally frozen – or “blocked.”  In order to contest the listing NPOs may need to access funds to pay for legal representation. Since December 2010 the Department of Treasury’s sanctions regulations https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-12-07/html/2010-30520.htm  permit NPOs and other entities and individuals to obtain free legal services and in some cases, to arrange payment for lawyers without first obtaining a license.

The regulation covers legal representation for groups or people listed under EO 12947 (1995), listing designations for those engaged in violence that threatens the Middle East peace process, EO 13224 (2001), which lists Specially Designated Global Terrorists and Foreign Terrorist Organizations listed by the Secretary of State. The rule can be found in Volume 75 Page 75904 of the Federal Register and in 31 of the Code of Federal Regulations Parts 594, 595, and 597.

Report Examines Impact of FATF on Civil Society

Date: 
May 23, 2017

Financial Action Task Force (FATF) Recommendation 8 and FATF recommendations following evaluations add to the restrictions faced by civil society organizations, according to a new report from Bread for the World, The Impact of International Counterterrorism on Civil Society Organisations: Understanding the Role of the Financial Action Task Force

Asserting that the links between measures that fight the financing of terrorism and civic space are not known widely, the report aims to "inform civil society organisations and non-profit organisations (NPOs), but also political decision makers who are not familiar with anti-terrorism measures." Specifically, it explains the role of FATF in setting international standards that affect the way in which civil society organisations are regulated by nation-states, their access to financial services, and their obligations to avoid proscribed organisations and other groups deemed to pose a terrorism risk. 

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