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June 29, 2015

The Financial Action Task Force (FATF) has said it will formalize its consultation process with the nonprofit organization (NPO) sector. At its June Plenary in Australia, FATF agreed to enhance its engagement with NPOs when workingon combating money laundering and terrorist financing by holding an annual discussion with NPOs on specific issues of common interest. It will also organize ad hoc exchanges on technical matters. 

May 12, 2015

Countering violent extremism (CVE) plays a prominent role in the second Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review (QDDR), the State Department’s policy roadmap, released April 28 by Secretary of State John Kerry. While the CVE strategy, as outlined in the report, emphasizes the importance of a free and functioning civil society, it echoes the rhetoric from the February White House Summit on CVE and the September 2014 presidential memorandum, which focuses on restrictions imposed by foreigh governments and does not address the global impact of U.S. restrictions on civil society. Despite this the report presents yet another potential opening to create dialogue around this issue.

April 27, 2015

Seventy nonprofit organizations (NPOs) from 28 countries submitted joint comments April 24, 2015 on the draft Financial Action Task Force (FATF) Best Practices Paper (BPP). The comments stressed that the final Best Practices Paper should guide governments on how to take a risk-based and proportional approach to protecting NPOs from terrorist abuse. The Transnational Nonprofit Working Group on FATF (Working Group) hopes that a consultation process between FATF and the NPO sector can be formalized so that NPOs are not again put in the position of trying to comment in a short time frame on a draft that has not been made publicly available.  

December 22, 2014

In a message at odds with the Obama administration’s Stand for Civil Society initiative, the State Department’s Assistant Secretary for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement, William Brownfield, told a Dec. 8 conference in South Asia that, because an unspecified portion of charitable dollars are diverted to terrorist financing, countries must “strengthen charitable regulations.” The statement was made in Bangladesh, where a week earlier the cabinet approved a highly restrictive civil society law that places tight limits on finances and activities of nonprofits.  Media reports on the speech interpreted it as praise for the restrictive new law. The U.S. Ambassador’s subsequent comments to the press were equally negative and lacking in any reference to the positive contributions of the nonprofit sector in countering violence. The Observatory for the Protection of Human Rights Defenders issued a statement on Dec. 12 calling on the government of Bangladesh to repeal the new law. The incident raises concerns that more South Asian governments will impose severe restrictions on civil society, with the appearance of U.S. support.

November 19, 2014

(Updated) The Cabinet of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) approved a “terrorist” list of 83 groups on Nov. 15, 2014 that ranges from armed terrorist groups like ISIS and Boko Haram to American and European Muslim humanitarian and rights groups, including the Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR) and the Muslim American Society (MAS).